<div dir="ltr">On Tue, Dec 18, 2012 at 8:13 PM, Ian Hickson <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:ian@hixie.ch" target="_blank">ian@hixie.ch</a>></span> wrote:<br><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
<div class="im">And then if you want to draw to a canvas instead of an off-screen buffer,<br></div>
you just use a Canvas instead of a DrawingBuffer.</blockquote><div style>So we're gonna get a document.createElement('canvas', {antialias:true, alpha:false, depth:false}) ?</div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
<div class="im">I don't know why you have to specify them at all. :-)</div></blockquote><div style>Because additional functionality that you do not need (such as alpha compositing, depth buffers, anti-aliasing, stenciling etc.) #1 occupy memory #2 slow things down. </div>
<div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
Why would a canvas (not context, you've explained why a context may wish<br>
to paint to different surfaces differently, e.g. to have an area with AA<br>
and an area without or something) ever need to have its settings changed?<br></blockquote><div style>You're not drawing the same thing. You're re-using expensive resources (such as vertex buffers, textures etc.) or using computed resources (RTTs) to draw different aspects of your application onto different surfaces.</div>
</div></div></div>